ENJOY THE ART OF WOOD ENGRAVING TO THE FULLEST USING RESINGRAVE FOR ITS USER FRIENDLINESS, VERSATILITY & QUALITY RESULTS

USER FRIENDLINESS -- For any artist, neither their creative energy be sapped nor their enthusiasm should be dampened by having to fight with their medium or tools, so user friendliness is an encouragement, especially to newcomers. One such advantage with Resingrave is its "see-where-you-are-going" engraving quality. Being an opaque, white bodied medium, after surface dark toning, cuts appear almost as they will appear in the print.  This means very precise location of cuts, and hence little need for proof print taking. One other big engraving advantage is the way steel gravers travel through it smoothly and effortlessly, the end-of-cut tailings readily detaching.

Appearance of print (left) vs block image (right)

Appearance of print (left) vs block image (right)

VERSATILITY OF ENGRAVING TECHNIQUE -- Resingrave is very responsive to both traditional steel gravers and commonly available powered rotary bits. Steel gravers (burins) can be chosen to yield both very fine detail as well as those for a bold wood cut style. Small elliptic tint tools can create very tight curves as well as long sinuous ones with sensitively controlled width variation for parallel line toning. Below is an example of a Resingrave print engraved in a traditional manner with steel gravers.

Sand Between Toes by Richard Woodman

Sand Between Toes by Richard Woodman

Powered rotary bits enable a whole new range of printmaking effects including graded tone stipple, linear engraving and rapid clearing of large white space areas. Rotary can be used in combination with steel gravers to compose an engraving or used to create the entire image as show below:

Silver Screen star Irene Dunn by Richard Woodman

Silver Screen star Irene Dunn by Richard Woodman

QUALITY RESULTS -- Resingrave compares most favorably with boxwood when it comes to print quality. Its similar physical qualities yields clean cut edges, smoothness of curves and fineness of detail. It also rivals boxwood for black line engraving and parallel line graded toning, two traditonal and popular techniques with 19th century engravers as shown here:

Belton Place by Richard Woodman

Belton Place by Richard Woodman